Study Finds Old Forgotten Head Injuries the Source of Many Mental/Emotional Issues

 What do learning disabilities, homelessness and alcoholism have in common? They may all be related to a long-ago head injury, according to emerging research.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that over 5 million Americans have a mental or physical disability due to such a brain injury, however this estimate is based only on hospital admissions — and does not take into account the countless others who did not seek medical attention.

“Unidentified traumatic brain injury is an unrecognized major source of social and vocational failure,” says Wayne A. Gordon, director of the Brain Injury Research Center at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York in The Wall Street Journal.

According to research from Mount Sinai, about 7-8 percent of the U.S. population has some form of traumatic brain injury — mild, moderate, or severe. Some of these head injuries may have happened long ago, and even be completely forgotten, yet could still be impacting your life.

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Super Dangerous Kids Football Head Injuries & Strokes!

football injuriesMore than 55 percent of high school students participate in athletics, activities that can lend invaluable experiences in teamwork and dedication along with boosting self-esteem and physical fitness levels.
Among them, football is ranked the most popular sport for high school boys, with over 1.1 million high-school-aged participants across the country, according to the 2008-09 High School Athletics Participation Survey conducted by the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS).

Unfortunately, football also results in more direct catastrophic injuries than any other sport tracked by the National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research, and appears to be much more dangerous at the high school level than the college level.

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What is the World’s Most Dangerous Sport? (We Bet You’ll NEVER Guess) Plus summer camp for some is right around the corner!

cheerleaderBetween 1982 and the spring of 2010, there were over 1,100 catastrophic injuries in high school and college sports, which includes any severe or fatal injury that occurred while participating in the sport.

Yet, a great portion of those injuries did not occur during a football, hockey, wrestling or any other type of contact sport, like you might suspect. They did not all occur during a baseball, soccer or basketball game either.

As it turns out, according to the National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, which recently released its 26th annual report on the topic, the sport that causes more serious and deadly injuries among women than any other sport is … cheerleading.

In all, during the period spanning 1982 to spring 2008, there were 152 fatalities, 379 non-fatal injuries and 374 serious injuries among high school sports, and 22 fatalities, 63 non-fatal injuries and 126 serious injuries among college sports.

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How to Practice Effective Hygiene if You Have Sensitive Skin, Allergies or Chemical Sensitivity

non-toxic personal care productsIf you have allergies, chemical sensitivity or sensitive skin, even something as simple as washing your face can be irritating. This is because soaps, shampoos and other personal care products often contain a toxic slew of chemicals.

Even for someone without sensitivities, everyday use of personal care products can lead to “chemical overload,” which may cause allergies or disease, according to a study by the Environmental Working Group (EWG).

On average, the study found that an adult uses nine different cosmetics each day, with exposes them to about 126 chemicals!

“It is not just the fact that these chemicals are being absorbed through the skin that is worrying,” says Lindsay McManus, an adviser on chemical sensitivity for Allergy UK on EWG.com. “Many of them are perfumed and the fragrance alone can contain 200 chemicals that need not be listed individually on the label, so people don’t know what they are getting.”

 

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Cavities: A Controversial Debate: Tooth Disease or Nutritional Problem?

Dental cavities are the most common disease in childhood and the most common chronic disease around the world. Since the 1930s and ‘40s, scientists have been exploring whether there is a genetic predisposition to cavities, or if diet and nutrition are to blame. Unfortunately, there is no absolute answer. Both genetics and nutrition play a role in a person’s predisposition to cavities; however, there is plenty you can do to limit tooth decay and cavities.

What Are Cavities?

Cavities, called dental caries by dental health professionals, are areas on the tooth where the enamel has been eaten away by acid. Cavities can occur anywhere on the surface of a tooth, but can continue to deepen beyond the surface and eat into the entire tooth structure. When they are small or surface cavities, treatment is managed with fillings. If cavities reach the root structure of the tooth, a root canal and crown will typically be required. Therefore, cavities are not just bad for your teeth; they can be expensive and cause multiple, inconvenient trips to the dentist to treat them. Further, the bacteria from your mouth can travel into your bloodstream and impact other areas of your body, an occurrence that is linked to heart disease, diabetes and more.

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